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Category Archives: LTE

LTE Map Exposes Lack of Rural Competition


Urban areas benefit from robust LTE competition while rural areas have few competing carriers, according to a recently updated map of LTE coverage from Mosaik Solutions.

Many urban centers are shown having five or more LTE networks, while rural areas with one or two networks operating.

“In rural areas, this often might translate to little need to enhance coverage from a purely commercial standpoint,” said Andrew Miceli, VP global sales and marketing at Mosaik, in a post on LinkedIn. “I’m a big advocate for improving our rural coverage for a lot of different reasons, not the least of which is public safety, so I am hoping to see regulation and new innovation that is friendly to such investment in the very near future!”

https://www.mosaik.com

 

LTE network Deployed in Deep Canadian mine

Ericsson and Ambra Solutions have collaborated on the deployment of an underground LTE network for the Agnico Eagle mining site, LaRonde, in Abitibi, Quebec, Canada.

Located 1.8 miles below the surface, the LTE network will provide data and voice mobility services across the site and enable several IoT use cases to improve safety and mining operations.

LTE cellular networks can provide data and voice mobility services over low frequency bands that allow a better propagation than any other available technology, delivering faster, more advanced wireless technology. A single LTE radio can cover up to 6km of tunnel, whereas it would take over 60 active Wi-Fi access points to cover the same area. The network in LaRonde, which is using the 850 MHz band, is the only private LTE network in Canadian underground mine.

The solution is based on the latest Ericsson Radio System portfolio of basebands and radio units, software upgradable to provide IoT capabilities for sensor-based applications and support 5G New Radio (NR) capability.

LTE networks open a new suite of capabilities and possibilities to cost effectively enable smart mining-related tasks for open pits or underground mines. Unlike other options, LTE networks allow the use of IoT sensors and devices to monitor, operate, and collect data throughout the mining site, for example related to air quality monitoring. This includes remote control operation of mining machinery, dispatch systems, emergency notification systems, access control systems, automated collection of data, ventilation fan monitoring and gas detection systems.

Graham Osborne, Ericsson Canada, said, “Our work with Ambra brings Ericsson technology to a specialized environment in a unique application. Deploying this underground LTE network will provide us with new learning opportunities in a novel application and how they can lead to future technologies and ideas.”

Virtual EPC Takes Root in Rocky Mountain WISP Network

By J. Sharpe Smith, Senior Editor

Software-based distributed evolved packet cores and innovative infrastructure-as-a-service business models my facilitate the deployment of everything from LTE fixed wireless and mobile networks in rural areas to in-building wireless in mid-sized enterprises.


Last week ExteNet Systems announced that it has deployed a Part 96-ready fixed wireless LTE-based network for Peak Internet, which provides broadband internet services to residential, small business, enterprise and government customers in Colorado Springs and Pike’s Peak.

ExteNet deployed a software-based distributed evolved packet core (EPC) with Nokia’s Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS)-ready LTE radios on the premises of Peak Internet to enable the service over the licensed 3.65 GHz band with a future, software-only upgrade path to the 3.5 GHz CBRS band. The deployment includes a will support future mobile roaming services for Tier 1 providers.

It is not ExteNet’s first foray into fixed wireless. Last September, it announced a similar deployment with a Cal.net, which provides broadband Internet services to rural communities in the Sierra Nevada foothills ranging from the northeast to the southeast of Sacramento.

In the past WISPs had to depend on WiMAX, Wi-Fi and some other proprietary wireless technologies, operating in the Part 90 spectrum. But things are changing for these mostly small, rural operators as LTE becomes more pervasive and affordable.

Five or six years ago, ExteNet, which is known for distributed antenna systems and distributed network systems, began mapping out what would be the next area of growth beyond the booms in wireless coverage and capacity. The next phase would be functionality, they decided.

“We needed typical core functionality to be distributed closer to the edge of the network,” said Tormod Larsen, ExteNet chief technology officer. “It couldn’t be based on expensive proprietary hardware, so we found a partner to develop a flexible software-based solution that resides on standard hardware platforms. We went to the rural markets with this scalable, software-driven effective packet core to enable WISPs and other operators to develop their LTE networks.” Additionally, a radio access network (RAN) vendor neutral approach was chosen, allowing the customer to choose its preferred RAN vendor.

ExteNet is making LTE more affordable by offering it on an infrastructure-as-a-service basis, distributing intelligence and control to the internet at the edge of the network and not in a carrier’s centralized core. ExteNet typically partners with the operator and offers them an economical avenue to purchase the EPC and the RAN equipment as an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) solution.

“The management platforms for Ericsson and Nokia can be expensive,” Larsen said. “ExteNet invests in the technology and requires long-term agreements from its customers. We spread the cost over multiple customers.”

ExteNet Systems Partners with Illinois Valley Cellular to Enable 4G LTE Connectivity

ExteNet’s game plan goes well beyond wireless internet service providers to bring enhanced broadband wireless connectivity to rural cellular carriers and building owners. Last October, the ExteNet announced a partnership with Illinois Valley Cellular (IVC) to enable 4G LTE broadband connectivity for north central Illinois.

ExteNet’s localized packet core served as a replacement to IVC’s hosted core approach, which greatly reduced backhaul costs and reduced latency by up to 75 percent. Additionally, it will eventually support mobile roaming services for Tier 1 providers while being 5G ready.

“Our combined EPC with our small cell and distributed network technology will help rural carriers compete with the tier-one carriers from a cost perspective,” Larsen said.

In the future, Larsen thinks the IaaS business model the virtual EPC will allow ExteNet to market CBRS private LTE systems to building owners in-building wireless systems or municipalities for IoT applications.


J. Sharpe Smith
Senior Editor/eDigest
J. Sharpe Smith joined AGL in 2007 as contributing editor to the magazine and as editor of eDigest email newsletter. He has 27 years of experience writing about industrial communications, paging, cellular, small cells, DAS and towers. Previously, he worked for the Enterprise Wireless Alliance as editor of the Enterprise Wireless Magazine. Before that, he edited the Wireless Journal for CTIA and he began his wireless journalism career with  Phillips Publishing, now Access Intelligence. 

As T-Mobile Turns on 600 MHz, Rural Towers Are the Early Winners

With characteristic bravado, T-Mobile began lighting up its 600 MHz LTE network in August, switching on a Nokia transmitter on a rooftop in Cheyenne, Wyoming. T-Mobile’s 600 MHz LTE network rollout will initially be in rural America and other markets where the spectrum is already clear of broadcasting. By the end of the year, an additional 600 MHz sites are slated for locations in Wyoming, Northwest Oregon, West Texas, Southwest Kansas, the Oklahoma panhandle, western North Dakota, Maine, coastal North Carolina, Central Pennsylvania, Central Virginia and Eastern Washington.

Jennifer Fritzsche: The broadcast incentive auction will supply T-Mobile ample low-band spectrum at a reasonable price and will open door for a possible merger. Our sense is discussions with tower operators to help with 600 MHz spectrum deployment are already ongoing. We do not see [T-Mobile] capital investment on this spectrum band to go into slowdown mode – even if a [Sprint / T-Mobile] merger is announced.

Ron Bizick: T-Mobile has been very aggressive in acquiring spectrum positions, which will lead to the need for new towers, as well as locating on existing towers. They fully intend to be competitive with AT&T and Verizon. That’s great for the tower industry.

 

LTE Lab Trial Sets Gigabit Speed Record

By The Editors of AGL

Verizon, Ericsson and Qualcomm Technologies continue to push the LTE speed envelope breaking the Gigabit speed barrier. The companies achieved an industry first with commercial silicon and network infrastructure with 1.07 Gbps download speeds using the Qualcomm Snapdragon X20 LTE Modem during an Ericsson lab trial.

This 1.07 Gbps achievement builds on Verizon’s recent announcement about Gigabit LTE with support for License Assisted Access (LAA). Also of significance, the 1.07 Gbps speed was achieved using only three 20 megahertz carriers of (Frequency Division Duplex using separate transmit and receive frequencies) spectrum, achieving new levels of spectral efficiency for commercial networks and devices. These efficiencies will enable the delivery of the Gigabit class experience to more customers and lead to new wireless innovations.

The companies achieved the 1.07 Gbps industry milestone by using 12 simultaneous LTE streams, which allow for up to 20 percent increase in peak data rates and capacity with a corresponding improvement in average speeds. Ericsson’s Radio System and LTE software, in concert with a mobile test device based on the Snapdragon X20 LTE modem, enabled these high speeds.

The lab tests also used 4×4 MIMO per carrier, 256 QAM per carrier, which enables customer devices and the network to exchange information in large amounts, delivering more bits of data in each transmission.